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What the world’s oldest eggs are revealing about dinosaur evolution

What the world’s oldest eggs are revealing about dinosaur evolution

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A study of the world’s earliest known dinosaur eggs reveals new information about the evolution of dinosaur reproduction. An international team of researchers led by Robert Reisz of the Department of Biology at the University of Toronto Mississauga studied the fossilized remains of eggs and eggshells discovered at sites in Argentina, China and South Africa-widely separated regions of the supercontinent Pangea. At 195 million years old, they are the earliest known eggs in the fossil record, and they were all laid by a group of stem sauropods-long-necked herbivores that ranged in size from four to eight metres in length and were the most common and widely spread dinosaurs of their time. Reisz is puzzled by the fact that “reptile and mammal precursors appear as skeletons in the fossil record starting 316 million years ago, yet we know nothing of their eggs and eggshells until 120 million years later. It’s a great mystery that eggs suddenly show up at this point, but not earlier.”
Source: What the world’s oldest eggs are revealing about dinosaur evolution