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Stone artefacts from 2.6 million years ago are the earliest Homo tools ever found in Ethopia

Stone artefacts from 2.6 million years ago are the earliest Homo tools ever found in Ethopia

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Humans are expert tool-makers, and as far back as 2.6 million years ago our stone age relatives were getting there too. That’s according to an analysis of 300 stone artefacts – including sharp-edged rock flakes and the rocks they have been chipped from, known as “cores” – published in the journal PNAS. The new trove of artefacts was unearthed in Ethiopia’s Afar Basin, a region that rocketed to fame in 1974 when the 3.2-million-year-old remains of our ancient relative “Lucy” (Australopithecus afarensis) were discovered. The new site – known as Bokol Dora 1 (BD 1) – lies just five kilometres away from the location of one of oldest fossil remains of our own genus, Homo, a lower jaw that is 2.8 million years old. Stone artefacts are the best evidence available of the early cognitive abilities of prehistoric humans. But discoveries in recent years show that other early hominins, lines that pre-dated the Homo lineage, got in on the act too. Primitive stone tools from the Lomekwi 3 site…
Source: class=”bbc_link” target=”_blank” rel=”noopener noreferrer”>Stone artefacts from 2.6 million years ago are the earliest Homo tools ever found in Ethopia

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