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Not quite Skynet but close: The ubiquity of surveillance cameras and the loss of privacy

Not quite Skynet but close: The ubiquity of surveillance cameras and the loss of privacy

If you’ve left your house since this morning — perhaps even if you haven’t — odds are you’ve already been captured on camera, probably more than once.

In fact, studies have found that the average city-dwelling American is captured on camera an average of 75 times in any given 24 hour period. This is, of course, in addition to the #selfies and user-generated imagery we voluntarily upload each day to apps and other social networking platforms. For any young person in the connected world, cameras are now a natural part of the ecosystem.

The ubiquitous recording of real-time events has undoubtedly changed the world, contributing untold depths to society’s knowledge about what happens everywhere, to everyone, all the time. Many companies are racing to combine machine learning algorithms into surveillance camera devices, giving them the ability to analyze the images they see and collect.

Once cameras take on more AI-capabilities and become more “sensing” rather than “imaging” devices, understanding that they can understand our movements and identities, we will have come that much closer to mechanically replicating the biological wonder that is human sight.
Source: Not quite Skynet but close: The ubiquity of surveillance cameras and the loss of privacy

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