Press "Enter" to skip to content

How do scientists know which regions of the brain control language?

How do scientists know which regions of the brain control language?

When you read something, you first need to detect the words and then to interpret them by determining context and meaning. This complex process involves many brain regions.

Detecting text usually involves the optic nerve and other nerve bundles delivering signals from the eyes to the visual cortex at the back of the brain. If you are reading in Braille, you use the sensory cortex towards the top of the brain. If you listen to someone else reading, then you use the auditory cortex not far from your ears.

A system of regions towards the back and middle of your brain help you interpret the text. These include the angular gyrus in the parietal lobe, Wernicke’s area (comprising mainly the top rear portion of the temporal lobe), insular cortex, basal ganglia and cerebellum.
Source: How do scientists know which regions of the brain control language?

Disqus Comments

Specify a Disqus shortname at Social Comments options page in admin panel

Facebook Comments

Mission News Theme by Compete Themes.